ACCELERATING THE SHIFT TO AN ENABLING STATE

Paving the way to an enabling state that releases the power of communities and the third sector and puts people at the heart of positive change, will be the focus for Our World Reimagined: big ideas for a better future (OWR) on Thursday 1 October.

Sarah Davidson, Chief Executive, Carnegie UK Trust (CUKT), will be in conversation with broadcaster and journalist Pennie Taylor, talking about an enabling state as part of this OWR series from Glasgow Council for the Voluntary Sector (GCVS).

The online autumn series features global leaders and key thinkers with innovative ideas that can help reshape society, improve lives and build a better world post COVID-19.

“It is evident all around us how large a part local voluntary organisations and community groups have played during lockdown, strengthening existing partnerships, forging new collaborations and demonstrating great flexibility and responsiveness right throughout the crisis,” said GCVS Chief Executive, Ian Bruce.

“With our sights set on building upon this and seeing a culture emerge where people and their communities are sufficiently supported to achieve positive change for themselves, we are delighted to welcome Sarah Davidson for this OWR Enabling State session. The CUKT team have been hugely influential in creating a route map to help public services progress towards an enabling state. They have also been busy taking account of what has been learnt so far from the emergency, bringing their guiding principles bang up to date.

“We want to explore what part the third sector can play in advancing the shift to an enabling state, empowering those same organisations, communities and individuals who have stepped up to the plate throughout the crisis.”

Commenting on her session, Sarah Davidson said: “Many of the immediate responses to COVID-19 from communities and from public services showed us that there really is a different way of working together. Community spirit and mutual aid have been reignited with great examples of statutory authorities working closely with the voluntary sector to help with the crisis response. New partnerships have emerged, and long-standing barriers to agility and flexibility have apparently been overcome in many – if not all – instances.

While it is important not to assume that the positive energy generated by the crisis can be easily harnessed and retained without significant effort and resource, we want to explore what happens next. How can we ensure community groups don’t fade out of the sightlines of the statutory bodies again and, instead, make the most of their new-found status, press to retain their access to funding and, in the process, help accelerate progress towards an enabling state?”

These questions will be explored in this next OWR session.

People can register for the free, one-hour OWR conversation with Sarah Davidson on Thursday 1 October, 2pm to 3pm. Click here.